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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
a fan of michigan state, but i don't know if you saw the game on saturday with michigan and notre dame, but it was quite something. enough about football. [laughter] huh? >> [inaudible] >> it's, well, i'm just amazed at the turnout here. i thank you for coming out on this night to be here. thank you very much. [cheers and applause] they even gave me a sippy cup. [laughter] i know you're all still recovering from the cnn tea party/republican debate last night. [laughter] how is it that cnn can actually join hands with the tea party, and together -- wolf blitzer said our partners, the tea party express. and i'm like, what kind of alternate universe is this? [laughter] i don't think it is. actually, it's the way it is now, suspect -- isn't it? can you imagine a debate that's called the cnn/teachers' union debate? [laughter] because i will contend there are more members of the teachers' union than there are of the tea party. [cheers and applause] i just don't think we're going to see that debate very soon. but anyways, i have a number of things going through my head that i'd like to say, a
pioneers in the area. they first came here in the 1830s in michigan. that my dad's family, you know they all went -- worked for factories and all that. they have all been great influences on me and feel very fortunate to have been. >> how often do you get back to flint? >> i am there every month. i live north of flint in northern michigan so my dad still lives down there. i am down there once or twice a month, spend a number of days there. he still drives and goes to mass mass every day, ghosted gym. clearly i did not obey him. but, no, i visit flint quite a bit and of course all of my friends are still there. >> a politically active family? >> i wouldn't say politically active? one of the first things i remember is my parents debating kennedy and nixon and my mom was for nixon and my dad was for kennedy. i can remember them out in the garage amid the boxes or whatever having this political debate in my dad being appalled because we are catholic and he would be our first catholic president. my mom's family, her dad was the head of the republican party in the area in the early part o
, actually. >> go ahead, mr. boog. >> yeah. he's a michigan boy. i grew up watching his work on flint, and this actually shows his life before he was a film maker. so i'm really looking forward to seeing these stories from his life. >> bob? >> i was going to say he is, we did a short interview with him in the paper, i think it was actually today which would be by the time you see this, last thursday, and he describes it as -- he says it's not a memoir, that's sort of an anti-memoir, just some stories including, um, i think he was 13 years old wandering around the capitol and got lost, and he ran into bobby kennedy. >> now, gentlemen, a book by michael moore, will that automatically be a large print run? >> i would say, yes. >> i'm sorry, jason, go ahead. >> oh, he has such a big following online already. if you go to his web site already, you can see all the people that are talking about this book. i think it's going to sell a lot of copies. >> well, two other well known authors who might generate automatic large print runs, and they're economic books. sylvia nasser and michael lewis.
. >> go ahead. >> he is a michigan boy. i grew up watching his work on flint. this actually shows his life before he was a filmmaker. i'm looking for a to seeing these stories from his life. >> we did a short interview with him in the paper today which would be by the time you see this last thursday and he describes it as not a memoir. it is sort of an anti mark, just some stories including i think he was 13 years of wandering around the capitol and got lost and ran into bobby kennedy. >> sentiment, a book by michael more. will that automatically be a large print run? >> i would say yes. >> i'm sorry. go ahead. >> he has such a big following online. go to his website and you can see all the people that are talking about this book. i think it will sell a lot of copies. >> well, two other well-known authors who might generate automatic large print runs, and economic books. sylvia nasser and michael lewis. grand pursued, the story of economic genius and boomerang, travels in the third world. what can you tell us about these two books, bob minzesheimer? >> well, probably best known for her las
at the same time, one in detroit, michigan, one in fort worth, texas, commuting back and forth. this in the '30s. 25,000 members between the two churches. after world war ii he gets involved in anti-communism, and he realizes that, hey, roman catholics and he are on the same page, and this man who was against the catholics in the '20s has an audience with pope pius xii in 1947. so's he was an interesting pragmatist. one little footnote, and then i'll take questions if you have them, something i didn't hit. in the 1940s one of norris' young students -- and he was always having young people come along. he was a charismatic kind of individual, and they sort of wanted to be like him and learn from him, and he had a reputation for not taking anything from anybody and so forth. was a young man by the name of john bear. that's -- birch. that's a name that you may know. john birch became a missionary sent out by norris' church to china. while he was in china, late '30s, early '40s, of course, that's when the war was heating up. john birch got involved with military operations and becam
. >> he is from michigan i watched his work on plant and shows his life before he was of filmmaker so i am looking forward to the stories from his life. >> we did a short interview with him in the paper i think today which was last thursday and described it as not a memoir but some stories including 13 years old and ran into bobby kennedy. >> a book by michael moore does that automatically be a large print run the? >> >> he has such a big following online. if you go to the website you see the people who are talking about the book i think it will sell a lot of copies. >> host: well-known authors who may generate automatic large branch runs our economic books. sylvia nasser comes out with grand pursuit and michael lewis, of boomerang troubles in the third-world. what can you tell us about these books bob minzesheimer? >> soviet is best known for her last book which is a beautiful mind which was the oxymoron in was helped by the fact that it became a movie with russell crowe. she has a big following. what she is trying to do is add some humanity and personality. this is a new idea that most p
, chicago athletic association, continental room on michigan avenue. i write here that he traced a chillingly accurate picture of the danger posed by islamic fundamentalism and his potential to release a virulent strain of terrorism on the world. old ideas had to be updated. he explains to the spellbound gathering old risk assessment model was advised. understood in the context of muslim thinking and had to be factored into our thinking of how twisted people could use this theme to create large acts of violence. he wrote at the time of the world trade center bombing, they were putting most of the eggs into the basket of the states that sponsor terrorism. he went on to say if you look at the world trade center bombings people that had been charged and convicted, they were egyptian, pakistani, kuwaity, iraqi and even u.s. persons all coming together. individuals pretty much identified because of their freedom to move across borders, they are bound by a jihad, religious belief as opposed to any nation or state that can quickly assemble or disperse. they beat the russians and beat on
by this story. but he is still a gifted man. he begins to pastor to churches. my michigan, one in fort worth texas. this in the 30s. 25,000 members between the two churches. after world war ii, he gets involved in anti-communism and he realizes that hey, roman catholics here in the same page and this man who was against the catholics in the 20,000 audience with pope pius the 12th in 1947. so he was an interesting pragmatist, a man who could change. but take some questions if you have been the something i didn't care. in the 1940s, but endorses students always having young people, log. a very charismatic kind of individual sort of wanted to be like him and had a reputation for not taking anything from anybody and so forth as a young man by the name of john birch. that is a name that you may know. john birch became a missionary set up a norris this church to china. while he was in china, bait 30s to early 40s, when the war was heating up, john birch got involved with military operations and became an intelligence a. john birch was actually very interesting individual himself. when doolittle's
20 particular counties in different places like michigan, california, and alaska, that kind of thing, and there's a national debate right now as to whether or not that's constitutional, whether that violates the federalism of those states, whether, you know, this is really a states issue and the federal government should get involved. we just had an anniversary of the voting rights act passage. i think that it's still an issue. you know, there's a question of is the south worse than other places; right? i think that's a legitimate questions, but this notion of a check on partisan officials and their changes, i think gets a good thing. i think it's a good thing in part because an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure better than a pound a cure. reviewing an election change before it's made is much less expensive than litigation after the fact, after you've had an election. it could be, you know, discriminatory or problematic. i think also what this review does is help all voters, not just voters of color because politicians are less likely to engage in shenanigans when they kno
and in michigan rick snyder, new republican governor passed sweeping reforms that will affect every kid in the school system in detroit. this is something to me that the millennials get implicitly and i think we need to start really looking at mountaintops when we have the next opportunity which will be in the next presidential election cycle. the other issue that ranks highly is the environment. i argue in my book we need to make a strong case for conservative environmentalism. the republican party has a pretty good history of environmentalism. teddy roosevelt, richard nixon, we can talk about climate change and acknowledge that climate change is happening but is also an inexact science. we know the cover of newsweek in 1975 showed that the globe was going to freeze over. we can acknowledge and talk about it in a reasonable way without embracing the left's solutions which would be -- levee enormous tax burdens for energy consumption. and frankly only reduce carbon emissions in the united states by a minimal amount without touching in the end china. so i think the deal with conservative
compiled the word list was somebody from michigan or dusseldorf, they didn't get all of them. it's probably some tens of thousands. but the fact of the matter is that even within the tens of thousands, you've got your synonyms, you've got your shades of meaning, and a lot of what are considered words in english aren't. and so, for example, we have the word ruthless. if you look in the oed, there's a word ruth, and not referring to your great aunt, but there's a word ruth that means mercy. it's not a word. it just happens to be in there because somebody put it there. but that's not a word in a real sense. if you subtracted them and you talk about how many words the typical english-speaking college graduate knows, then you get closer to that 30,000, 40,000. so it's that way. but certainly the larger developed languages do have larger vocabularies partly because you can catch them all in amber in these big dictionaries. and also words for us, um, they don't go out of style because you can capture them in dictionary whereas in an indigenous culture, there'll be a word that's used for hundreds a
a somebody from michigan. it is probably tens of thousands but the fact is that even within the tens of thousands of synonyms and shades of meaning and a lot are considered words and english are not. for example, we have the word ruth that means mercy. that is not a word is just in there because somebody put it there but that is not a word if you subtracted them the typical english speaking college graduate knows then you get closer to the 30 or 40,000. but certainly the larger developed languages to have a larger vocabulary is because you can catch them all in amber in the big dictionaries and also words for us down to go out of style because you can capture them in dictionaries but in the indigenous culture a word will be used hundreds of hundreds of years then it drops away and then in nobody remembers that at all. that does not have been with us. i think that is the answer to the question. >> that did it if we can give a round of applause. [applause] >> i think probably everybody in this room wearing a uniform are here because of the board e those one way or another if you think
. >> sarah vowell is our guest and the first call for her comes from michigan. good morning you are on book tv on c-span2. >> caller: hello. thank you very much. i'd like to ask ms. vowell if she thinks that this western as -- westernization ms. moore religious and cultural what they called the white man's beard or was it just commercial people basically to make money, commercialization. >> it's the united states, you don't have to choose. because you have these missionaries and you have these commercial sailors, you have both been going on at once. those missionaries, especially the early ones, they weren't quite idealistic and the accomplished a lot just in terms of literacy, so culturally -- ayman the interesting thing about what the did sites teaching more or less the entire population to read within a generation and 19th century hawaii was maybe the most literate country on earth because of their efforts, and as a consequence those missionaries taught the first generation of hawaii and writers and historians to write and so that the same time they are trying to dismantle the traditiona
at the university of michigan. each of them treats this idea in each of the three in a different way, and still, and some of the books that are still to come in this series also promise to be very interested. vanessa oaks is writing, bruce chilton who many of you may have heard of is writing a biography of the book of revelation. [laughter] so -- >> if he finishes it in a hurry. >> yeah, yeah. right. [laughter] i think october 20th is the deadline. [laughter] the dead sea scrolls. you did, you did try to avoid those anthroto morphic moments, but i thought one thing you said that was quite important was to think about, um, not just the physical object, but its soul, the book's soul. so in thinking about dietrich bonhoeffer and what he left postwar theology, what is the -- when you were thinking about the soul of his letters and papers, how did you come to assess that in terms of its effect on its readersesome? >> aristotle and leon cast and i define soul this way -- [laughter] >> good threesome. >> soul is the integrated, vital power of any organic body so long as it is open to possibility and o
this was was somebody from michigan or dusseldorf it is probably tens of thousands. the fact of the matter is that even within the tens of thousands you have your synonyms, shades of meaning. and a lot of what are considered words in english aren't. and so, for example, we have the word ruthless. well, there is a word to roost, and they're not referring to your great odds. it means mercy. it is not a word. it just happens to be in there because somebody put it there, but that is not a word in a real sense. if you subtracted and and talk about how many words the typical english speaking college graduate knows, you get closer to that 30,000, 40,000. so it is that way, but certainly the larger developed languages to have larger vocabulary's, partly because you can catch them all in amber in these big dictionaries. also, words for us, they don't go out of style because you can be -- you can capture them and dictionary. whereas in indigenous culture there'll be a word that is used for hundreds and hundreds of years and then it drops away and no one remembers it at all. that does not happen with us. i think
. >> host: first call for sarah vowell is from michigan. good morning. you are on booktv on c-span2. >> caller: thank you very much. i would like to ask sarah vowell if she thinks the western is asian of hawaii was more religious than cultural. what they call the white man's spirit or was it commercial? people basically wanting to make money? commercialization versus the white man's burden? >> guest: it is the united states. you don't have to choose. you have missionaries and commercial sailors. you have both things going on at once. those missionaries, especially the early ones were not quite idealistic and they accomplished a lot in terms of literacy. culturally the interesting thing about what they did besides teaching the entire population to read within a generation, hawaii was the most literate country on earth because of their efforts. as a consequence those missionaries taught the first generation of wine writers and historians to write. at the same time they are trying to dismantle the traditional hawaiian culture especially in terms of religion and dress the missionaries h
michigan, good afternoon. >> caller: jackson, mississippi,. >> host: sorry about that. >> caller: wanted to know, his roots in the deep south and his response to the movement as being led by doctor cornell. >> guest: i'm not sure i would call anything a movement, but i think that cornell and, we surfaced on this in passing before, i both cornell and others have become sharp critics of the obama administration. and in effect they don't think that obama is doing enough for people who do not have privilege in this country. they think that the obama policies have been tilted too far towards, towards the corporate elite and towards the moneyed elite. and as i said before i think that's fair criticisms. i don't believe, i don't know how they are characterized beyond that but i don't believe that either one of those would say they are leading a movement. i think what they're doing is they are trying to mobilize people who aren't particularly in a point of view and the press the president to embrace a more and encompassing set of policies. >> host: diane williams e-mails in from tampa. thank you
, that the mullahs of dearborn, what they call michigan-istan want to say in the same polity as gambling of fire island. each might decide they're better off going alone. there is something more basic. take a retired federal bureaucrat in her early 50s, retired on fantastic unsustainable pension benefits and health benefits, and enjoying the early years of what is in effect a 30-year holiday weekend, she lives at 26 elm street. the guy at 24 he will misdemeanor street went exactly the same school as her. he doesn't get the 30-day holiday weekend. he has to go to work at hardware store until he drops dead to fund lavish retirement benefits of his neighbor and the retirement that he will never know. those two people can not coexist in the same street anymore than they can in athens or in london. another chasm, young versus old. what is left of american youth will be taxed to the hilt to pay for the retirement and medical care of a baby boom generation who enjoyed a life of american prosperity that their kids will never know. look at the flashmobs. look at the gleeful rampage at the wisconsin state
of those people. the person who combated the word list is threatened michigan. they didn't get all of them, but it is probably some tens of thousands. the fact of the matter is that even within the tens of thousands you got your synonyms, shades of meanings kind of a lot of what are considered words in english aren't. and so for example, we had to work worthless. if you look at the oed, there is the word roots, not referring to your great aunt, but ruth means mercy. it's not a word. it just happens to be in there because somebody put it there. that is not a word in a real sense. if we subtract down and talk about how many words the typical english-speaking college graduate knows, then you get closer to that 30,000, 40,000. so it's that way, but certainly the larger developed languages do have vocabularies because you can catch them all in these big dictionaries. and also, words for us don't go out of style because you can capture them in dictionaries. with an indigenous culture, there'll be a word used for hundreds and hundreds of years that drops away and nobody remembers that at all. tha
bachelor's degree from smith college and a master's degree in economics from the university of michigan. ms. lee is co-author of a field guide to the global economy. she is an expert on the north american free trade agreement, international trade, wage inequality and the steel and textile industries. she has appeared on numerous national television and radio shows. she has also on the board of directors of worker rights consortium, united for the fair economy and the national bureau of economic research. ms. lee will you give your opening statement please? >> thank you your honor. good evening ladies and gentlemen of the jury. i submit to you the charges against my client, the public unions of america and the hard-working men and women who belong to them are utterly baseless and should be thrown out of this court. the prosecution's case is founded on shoddy statistics, isolated nonrepresentative anecdotal evidence of a false premise. moreover, i will demonstrate beyond a reasonable doubt that my client has been unfairly scapegoated and is being blamed for crimes that were in fact committed
prize. i publish a newspaper. we've been publishing the michigan bulletin for 17 years here, and my dad is one of those people who are remembered as a kid used to go down south and he would bring people up in the car. he would drive down and he would pick up some of the guys out of alabama. they're still here in the community and they are like me, their kids are first generation from the south and their kids kids are now here. i really appreciate that you hide light of that type of thing. .. >> caller: do we stay and try to reto our institutions, do we restack the churches, do we come out with our own measures and demand this community make the adjustment for us and fight for our place here in the sun? >> host: all right, lansing, thank you so much. >> guest: it's my belief that this great migration that occur inside the 20th century was a water shed event that helped bring us to a point where legalized caste system as it had existed for so long, for three or four generations, was no longer legally on the books. that was a major change in our history. the next migration or the next
, indiana, illinois, michigan and wisconsin. five states that composed an area bigger than all of france. hugely important part of our country. it's always, ever since. that charter, that law passed by that supposedly inadequate congress did two things that neither -- neither of which the constitution did. one, it said there will be public education. two, there will be no slavery. in other words, we had banned slavery in just huge part of the united states before we even wrote the constitution. and that's the kind of thing were better known and more appreciated. because the people who did that really pulled off something magnificent and brave. brave. i'm very interested in bravery. not just bravery in battle but bravery with ideas, integrity and a willingness -- a willingness to go down to the feet if it's the right thing to do. the fact that john adams did not lead us into a war with france when we would have been headed for disaster deserves more credit. we need to judge more of these people not what they didn't do. not what they did do. eisenhower decided not to go into vietnam. and t
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)